Rebecca Heiss

277: The Science of Confidence with Rebecca Heiss

Hey, Movers!

Today on the show we’re looking at the science of confidence with biologist, keynote speaker – and the hilarious and delightful – Rebecca Heiss! In other words – how do we create and discover our own self-confidence? How do we trick our brain into taking risks? And how do we develop that magic sparkle that audiences are just hungry for? Well – take a listen to this super power-packed episode full of tangible advice for us so we can show up at our bravest in the biggest moments! 

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@SALLYZ_BEMOVED

Transcript

Fear. It is just a part of what we do as speakers, but it does not have to hold us back. And yes, even the best speakers face their fears time and again. Me too. I love speaking and I get freaked out sometimes we should be facing our fears fear and speaking they go together. If there’s no fear in your speaking, I’m worried you’re not challenging yourself enough. So let’s talk about this fear thing.

Hey, movers, it’s Sally Z with Be Moved.

Let’s go create some talks that will move this world. We’re gonna talk with amazing speakers, share tips, tricks, resources.

And we are going to be moved so that our audience can be moved. This moved me, what is moving you?

Hey, everybody, welcome back to This Moved Me, my name is Sally Z. And I am so delighted to be your speaker coach because I empower big-hearted entrepreneurs and changemakers like you to leverage your authentic voice scale, your impact and have the kind of growth and authority that you have always dreamed of. Speaking can do that. So that’s what we’re talking about together. Here on the show.

Today, what is moving me is this idea of fear, tackling our fears that fears are just a part of speaking. And that’s okay. It is okay. Sometimes I think people think that if they have fears in their speaking, it means something like maybe they shouldn’t be speaking or maybe they can never be awesome at speaking, or just other people who are really good at it don’t have fears, which is absolutely not true. If you are not tapping into some kind of nerves, you’re probably just not challenging yourself enough. You’re taking the easy route.

So I thought it would be awesome to bring on the show with me today an expert on fear, and what happens in our bodies. And her name is Rebecca Heiss. Now I’m holding Rebecca’s brand new book. It came out today like literally it just arrived. So I haven’t had a chance to read it yet. But I loved my conversation with Rebecca. She is a delight. And she has studied what happens in our bodies when we are facing our fears. Let me read this to you: “rewire your brain with science-backed solutions to increase productivity and achieve success.”

So she’s really talking about what’s going on in our brain and how can we rewire it to do bigger things to get past our fears and to you know, make a bigger impact. So this is truly what’s going on on the inside. Plus what’s so awesome is that Rebecca is also a keynote speaker herself. So she’s speaking from her own experience to all of you today as a speaker but also bringing with her all the smarts and knowledge. Ph.D. people, Ph.D. She’s big. Plus, she’s so funny. So I’m really excited for you to check out the show with her.

All right now before we dive into the show, it’s my moment to invite you into the Emerging Speaker Society. This is the brand new Facebook group you do not want to miss out on all of the fun that is happening over there we are doing daily inspiration, weekly trainings happening over there where we all show up live and people can ask me questions and I’m bringing some new insight and we dig a little bit deeper into the show that we talked about here together. It’s like the next level over in the Facebook group and then everyone’s so on we do these monthly challenges that are super fun as well. All to help you up-level your speaking take you from a newbie to an emerging speaker to a pro speaker you are making consistent revenue from your speaking planned revenue.

You know, I’m speaking so much I’m getting paid on the regular. That’s awesome. Let’s do that more. Right, right? Okay, so you definitely want to come check out what is happening in this group. We would love to see you there. You can find us over at bemoved.com/ess. Alright, my friends. Let’s jump into the show with Rebecca Heiss.

Rebecca:
Right. It’s all about fear. I know it’s really exciting. It’s all about fear and what drives us and like yeah, mindset how we can adjust our mindsets to say fear excitement, same thing. It’s fine.

Sally:
Yes, okay. So that’s a real thing. I say that. And I have been saying that for years that the difference between fear and excitement is literally how you see it and, and your own, like interpretation of it. It’s the same physical experience.

Rebecca:
Yeah, it might is that you’re totally correct. Yeah, that is 100% accurate. So literally, the brain releases these love starts in your brain goes on your adrenals your release, cortisol, adrenaline, right? All these neurotransmitters that make you go, oh, and then you have to decide, right? Is this a fear response? Am I stressed about something? Am I anxious? Or am I excited? Because it’s the exact same thing. It’s just the story that you tell yourself. And the thing that I tell people is like, your brain literally believes the story that you tell it. Right? It 100% believes the story.

Sally:
Okay, Rebecca, I want to give you a chance to share with us a little bit of your story, actually, I’m going to tell you a story because I think it does apply later on to how I approach speaking. I, I knew that I wanted to be on stage when I was eight years old. Like I knew I love theater, I loved it. But I went to my four h because that’s where you could be on stage, right? There’s not big theater opportunities. And I won my like city competition for public speaking. And I moved on to county and I won that. And now I’m like feeling confident people are talking about this, like, hey, she’s pretty good at that. And I made it to states, and I went to states. And the day of the competition, I played sick, because I was so scared of failing, right? I was so scared, I let all these fears drive my behaviors. And I guarantee you each and every one of us has some story like that, right? Where we let our fears dictate our behavior. And it took me four degrees in biology to get back to being on stage to get back to the thing that I love. Because I felt like I had to prove myself I had something to, you know, to show the world like I can do things. And so I do love biology. That is my background, I started as an ornithologist, and that’s a bird nerd. 

I studied crows, those big, beautiful black birds that everybody hates. They’re my babies. Yeah, I play them for a decade, for a decade. That’s a whole first half of my career. Anyway, I ended up doing a master’s degree looking at evolution in human behavior I got really interested in, in understanding why we behave the way we do, but was using birds as a model did a Ph.D. in stress physiology, again, using birds as a model, understanding how our bodies respond to stress, and ended up you know, as a professor teaching, and I opened a school as one of the founding members of a school-based in impact based learning and innovation and, and had an opportunity to give a TEDx. And I was like, Oh, boy, right back to that eight-year-old self, you know, I could feel and gave a TEDx and haven’t looked back, I have been so fortunate in my career in being able to use the biology, which is the basis of all of my knowledge, and incorporate it into business and say, Look, there’s so many behaviors that are driven by our body, by the way, our body reacts to various stimuli. And if we can get control over that, if we control this, I mean, Wow, what an opportunity. Most people, there’s a superhuman power, if you can gain control over your own fear, if you can operate from this conscious cognitive gift of a brain that we all have. You’re superhuman and, and that’s, that’s the thing about it.

Sally:
I do think that it is the final stage and full professionalism as a speaker. And I don’t mean that in any specific way, like you have been dubbed a professional. But taking us from, I’m so focused on my content, and I want to get my content, right. And we kind of obsess over the slides. And we’re just like trying to all the to control all these things. And we’re not focused on this piece up here. And this is where the whole game is.

Rebecca:
So magic.

Sally:
it is everything. Because you can do everything right, and not have your head in the game in the right way or the most helpful way or in a way that really lets you be present. And it doesn’t matter.

Rebecca
Yeah. No, I’ll tell you that’s exactly that was my experience. When I first started speaking, I was like, here’s some facts and here’s some facts and here’s some facts and and nobody connects with that. Right? I wasn’t calm enough. I wasn’t over these fears, enough to have an engaging, emotional, frontal lobe kind of conversation with people and that’s what we crave as humans, right? We crave this connection. That’s the longing…she sees me, right, this is, ah, and if we’re in a state of doubt that that nobody is going to felt seen or heard, even though you’re doing the speaking. Yeah.

Sally:
Oh, it’s true. And, and it’s interesting. So in my, my signature talk studio course, I used to start with mindset because I was like, this is so important. It’s really, really important. But what I found was when people really needed it was after they had developed all of their content, because it is the thing that makes the difference between, I’m here, and I’m going to do this thing. And I went through the process, and I, and I’ve got my content, I’ve got everything all together, and the sparkle, the Wow, the enjoyment of the opportunities that we have with each other. Because if we are if we cannot bring a little sparkle, if we cannot show up wanting to truly connect with a billboard, nobody’s gonna care about it.

Rebecca:
You just nailed it. That’s exactly it. It’s the sparkle. It’s the, it’s the fun, like having fun. nobody out there is having fun. We’re not gonna have a good time together. So until we can get to that space, you nailed it right there. I’ve never heard it articulated quite that well. Just bring fun, bring the enjoyment from inside here, and then everybody else will have it. Yeah.

Sally:
So I was listening to a podcast yesterday with a woman and she was talking about the selling intangibles. And she has a background as a pitch artist. Her name is Stacy Boehman. She works with life coaches, and she helps teach them how to sell and make money as a life coach. I’m not a life coach. But I am a coach. And I do a lot of selling. And I was like, I’m so curious to hear her. Well, she has this fascinating background. She’s a she was a pitch artists like the person in the big box stores selling lint rollers. And she’s a theater background. So I was like, she is so fascinating. Hmm. I’ve never heard her talk about the intangibles of selling, which is what I talked about when we were like, bringing your authentic voice and being present and connected. And the energy that you have behind what you’re saying and that what we’re talking about right now is the sparkle. Well, I think the intangibles that we’re trying to get ourselves to a place where we can bring that. And it’s a mind game.

Rebecca:
Yeah, it is. And the cool thing about like, when you look at the biology of sort of communication and audiences is you have you heard of mirror not mirror neurons before? Yes, right. Okay, so the idea that if I’m interacting with you, you’re actually picking up on my emotion and my intention, and reflecting that back to me. So if I show up, right, and I, here I am, I’m going to deliver this big speech to you. And I show up and I’m like, so Sally, and I am so worried for me, like, our audience is going, Oh, you’re okay, you’re there. This is not. Right. But if I show up, and I am having fun, it is hard. It’s like white laughter is so contagious. If I sit here, and I just like got going, and I’m like, aha, we start laughing. You can’t help but smile. Yeah. And so there’s there’s this great, you know, opportunity for us to bring that through ourselves, to our audiences and have that reflected back to us.

Sally:
Oh, yes, Mirror mirror neurons is that level of connection, where we are co I call it quote, we’re co creating with the audience, they are imagining what we are saying. And it’s based on their own life experiences. And so it’s this, it’s really trippy, actually, when you really think about I’m like,

Rebecca:
Yeah, absolutely. It’s very meta.

Sally:
It’s so cool. I love it. Okay, so Rebecca, let’s get if we can take a few minutes, let’s get really specific about what we can do. Let’s dive into your expertise. We’ll pull it out front to bring the body from a place of fear, where the the body’s having a different reaction, all the hormones that are flooding the system that are pulling us out of the moment. What can we do? What are some steps that we can take in the moment to get our head straight, and our body in line?

Rebecca:
Yeah, it’s great. So in that moment, there’s not much you can do and then it really is. It truly is because your body’s taking over. And so we control the tips of our fingers, right? We’re in an environment, we don’t control the environment. If we’re there, the only thing that we can control is between our ears. It’s the interpretation of the experience. So I talk a lot about whether things are going to be an adventure or an ordeal. That’s what you control. Your body is releasing chemicals, you don’t have control over that. The cool thing is that those chemicals that you’re releasing, get interpreted here. And you do have control over this, right? So if you’re feeling distress, and this anxiety, and oh my gosh, you can say, Oh, I must be excited. And that shift is very subtle. It’s the exact same hormones, right? Fear and excitement, same adrenaline and cortisol cocktail. But the interpretation is, hmm, alright, I’m excited. So if I’m excited, what would I do if I was excited? Well, I’d smile, right at smile, because I’m excited. I’m gonna take a deep breath because I’m safe, right? Nothing bad is going to happen here. I don’t need to be in fear, I’m safe. So that breath work that we talked about, I don’t want to want to do I’m going to overemphasize it. Because so, so important, it is what you have control over. And that single, slow, deep breath that you take, allows this whole cluttering, like chatter back here in the subconscious, to shut off and turn on this frontal lobe. That is literally what turns on your frontal lobe where you’re making conscious cognitive decisions from if you want control over your executive portion of your brain. It’s all about taking slow breaths and signaling to your body. I’m not in danger, not in danger. This isn’t a tiger. I’m not allowed to get pounced on. The worst thing that happens is what I freeze, okay. All right, and then I can take a breath, and try to get and then Oh, god, I’m gonna say something wrong. Okay. And then I can own my mistake. And it turns out, we like people more when they screw up. It’s I call it, I call it the Jennifer Lawrence effect, right? You we love Jennifer Lawrence. She’s a great actress, but she, she does stupid stuff all the time and falls on red carpet events. And she doesn’t get up in like, Oh, nothing happens. No, she gets up. She’s laughing. She owns it. And we love her for it. So keeping in mind that it’s actually it’s there’s science behind it’s called the Pratt effect. And when we are human right when we allow ourselves to own our mistakes and just say, Well, that was a, that was a disaster. We’re more likeable. We’re trusted more people see higher leadership potential in us the original effect design study, they had an interviewee come in and answer like 90% perfectly accurate answers. Then a second interview, he came in exact same thing 90% perfectly just before he left though, get a cup of coffee, and spilled the cheese. Kanzi? Who gets hired, of course, the one who makes the mistake, right? And, and is seen as more valuable, more committed more leadership, potential, all of these things that play out because we’re vulnerable. We’re human. We’re making these errors and it’s not life or death. It’s fine. Take that deep breath.

Sally:
This is so huge to me, because I talk about this. I talk about this all the time with my speakers that your perfect story, you just sharing everything that you know, and saying, Here’s all of my advice, and my you know, all the good stuff, essentially. Yeah. Yeah. I might admire it from afar, and appreciate it from afar. Yeah, but I’m not going to believe that I can do it.

Rebecca:
And yeah, I don’t want it.

Sally:
Yeah, no. So I love it. So Pratt is in like a pratfall.

Rebecca:
Like the, the PRATT. Perfect. I love it. I didn’t know it was a real thing. That’s a real thing.

Sally:
I love it when eventually all my theories get validated. Now I am.

Rebecca:
I’ll tell you what, Sally, here’s the deal. Please keep talking about this. But can we call it the Jennifer Lawrence attacks because I am like bound and determined to get her on one of my podcasts and just have her gas in a massive way and be like, yes, that is why we love you.

Sally:
We’re renaming it the Jenna Lawrence effect.

Rebecca:
Thank you. Thank you just feel like we’d be tight friends. Do you see that? Right there. That’s the tip for your speakers, right because you feel relatable. You feel I feel like I know her. I don’t know her. No clue who she is right. But I feel like I can relate to her. Yeah, yeah, cuz I know, stuff. Right. I know I gap. I know I fall I’m clumsy. I get that. Yeah.

Sally:
Totally. Oh my gosh, we just renamed the Pratt effect the Jennifer Lawrence effect, which is. Okay, so one more thing I want to pick your brain on. And that is this concept of confidence. Right, which is, you know, we all want more confidence for ourselves in the big moments in particular.

Rebecca: Sure.

Sally:
But getting to a place of confidence is I want to hear you talk about that a little bit. Because I think I think I know your approach on this and your philosophy. And I think it’s really important for us to hear from a neurological standpoint, how you actually get to confidence.

Rebecca:
You lie. You heard it here, first you lie. It seriously, you start lying to yourself, feel confident. Okay, I’m confident here we go like is a complete self-deception. And yet, our brains are literally built for self-deception. We self deceive all the time when it serves us. So we can use that to our advantage. If our brains are already aligned to do that, look, 93% of us believe that we’re better than the average driver. That typically doesn’t work out. And I’m like, I know that I’m one of those, like, I know I’m better than the average driver.

No, of course not. But this whole concept of self-deceit is built into our brains, so we can use it to our advantage. When I say lie to yourself, I mean it right, you’re not gonna believe yourself, when you first start saying I’m a good speaker. I’m a good to be here, I’m just going to walk out and I’m going to blow them away. And it sounds so cheesy, because it sounds just like those, like the SNL character from the early 90s.

Like, I’m good enough, I’m down on it. People like me, right? But it turns out, there’s science that backs that. So the more we repeat these stories to ourselves, the more our brain buys into them, and the more our brain buys into them, the more we actually react, our bodies react as if it were true. And so we start with a lie can become the truth. So again, telling yourself repeating that, putting it up on on on the wall. So you see it every morning, repeating these mantras to yourself is huge. And I’m also a big fan of meditation. So meditation is what allows you to separate the gap between a stimulus and a response, most of us will just react, right? We’re just we’re in the point of stress, we just react. And that’s that fight-flight freeze response. If we meditate, we have a little more space between that stimulus of like stepping on stage, and how we choose to respond. It gives us that pause that momentary breath to say is that is this a story that’s helping me right now? Am I telling myself I’m going to fail? I don’t, I don’t need you right now. Come back later. Right. And we can replace all of those automatic negative thoughts that like I’m a failure, I’m gonna get rejected with what I call pets. If automatic negative thoughts are ants, right, which is come and swarm our brains, then these practice enlightened thoughts. pets, cute, right? Can, can serve as replacements. Because we know from the Power of Habit, right? You can’t just quit something. If you’re a smoker, you can’t just give up smoking, you have to replace it with something like maybe chewing gum. Same thing with our brain. If our brain is conditioned for these automatic negative thoughts, we can’t just quit them. We can’t just smoosh all of those ads and say, I’m never gonna think of myself as a failure. Again, we have to replace it with something else. So instead of I’m a failure, oh, I’m not ready yet. Right? What am I going to do to prepare myself or instead of, Hey, I’m going to be rejected? I’m gonna be amazing. And who rejects me they need to find themselves a better tribe? Right? These, these stories and be replaced, but it takes practice. It takes effort. Cuts require care.

Sally:
Oh, it’s so great. I love it. Yes.

Oh my gosh. Okay. So my homework for people listening, is I want you to identify one ant, automatic negative thought and find a replacement. snuff it out with a pet.

Rebecca:
Yes, practice enlightened thought. Because you can have an enlightened thought anytime like, I’m good. I’m really good speaker. And then it goes away. Right? Those practice enlightened thoughts require the care of a pet. Yeah, take care of it.

Sally:
Yeah, so I’ve heard it talked about too, that if you’re telling yourself something and you don’t buy it yet, you have to believe harder. Believe it harder. You’re haven’t convinced yourself yet. And that’s fine. You’re just at the beginning stages of this. Practicing Have the enlightened thoughts, right? So bad harder?

Rebecca:
Yeah. So, Sally that the example that I give to people is like, would you remember the first time that you drove a car?

Sally:
Vaguely

Rebecca:
Slightly terrifying that like your hand pendant to, and you’re like looking at oh my gosh, there’s pedestrians and speedometers and so much to patients. And now you’re like rolling down the sidewalk, you know, like, with my one hand on the wheel, and I’m talking to kids. Right? Because I’ve trained my subconscious to drive for me, if you can train your subconscious to do this complex task of driving, we can certainly train him to override stories that aren’t helpful anymore. But he takes practice, it takes time to put in the time to become a great driver, right or a great speaker.

Sally:
Oh, yes, so good. There are so many awesome nuggets in this Rebecca. so fabulous. Okay, before we go, I’d love to hear very quickly, a this moved me moment that has happened for you lately, because I think we, as leaders and speakers, we need to pay really close attention to what’s moving us so that we can then turn that around and move our audience. So what’s been moving you lately?

Rebecca:
Oh, my gosh, that is? That is a really good question. Because I get moved so easily. I, I, I’ve never had that perspective before I have other offered up as maybe that’s because I’m paying attention because I’m a speaker. And because I need to use moments. So I’m going to take that nugget. Thank you. And what moves me I think is the power. Actually, this is a great example. And it’s it’s so cheesy, because it’s it’s not an emotional thing at all the GameStop thing that’s happening right now with stock market. So this group of complete amateurs, right, decided they want to take down the man and the they collaborate, they have this amazing community, and things like that actually moved me because I started thinking about the power of community and cooperation and belonging. And even if, you know, there’s the beautiful thing about this incredible world that we live in right now with 8 billion other individuals is there is always an opportunity to find your community. And things that you’re doing, like this podcast that bring a community together, I think are so powerful, there’s so many powerful moments that get shared that can transcend the most big powerful things on Earth, like stock markets and hedge funds and, you know, much bigger enemies. So, I think I think what’s moving me right now is the power of cooperation and how, how a single individual a single thought a single idea can, can unite people and, and do. I mean, I don’t want to say do good in that context. But you know, do something make me tape.

Sally:
Right? Yeah, absolutely. I just did, and I’ll share this as my this move me moment to to piggyback off of what you just shared. Yes, there’s a woman I follow on Instagram. Her name is Sharon Says So.

Rebecca:
Oh, I love it. I read it.

Sally:
She is she’s a fellow Minnesotan. So I feel like a kinship with her. But she teaches government to adults. And she’s all about trying to create a fact revolution. Right. So she’s trying to snuff out, you know, dangerous ideas that are being spread fake news, right? Sure. Yeah. Yeah. So and she’s fabulous. And nobody can figure out if she’s a conservative or a liberal. Democrat, right. It’s so fascinating. She’s really fun and funny, and so knowledgeable. So I’ve really enjoyed connecting with her. Her page has just taken off in the last few months for good reason. Right? So she now has some influence and power but I don’t think she really gets it yet. And so she set out a goal to raise some money for the, it’s called rip medical debt, I think, hmm. To help you know, essentially eliminate people’s medical debt.

Rebecca:
Oh my god

Sally:
And this organization. I don’t know exactly how this works. So this is not a great story yet, but I did…

Rebecca:
It is!

Sally:
So this organization, if you give $1 it’s basically they can 100 times it with their networks and stuff. Right. So she had said let’s raise I think she was like let’s raise $20,000 here together, which is a lot of money. Let’s raise Yeah, $1,000 and we’ll be able to eliminate like 2 million dollars of medical debt. Like, that’s incredible. Well, she raised $20,000 in a few hours, and she was like, let’s keep going. Let’s keep going. So, all day yesterday, it was like watching and she’s just crying. She’s watching all this money come in $5 million $10 million, $12 million $15,000,000.20 $2 million. Essentially, they have raised together. In 24 hours, she was like, the organization was blown away, she was blown away. And it just kind of like this GameStop thing, right? It’s this tiny, tiny, but it’s a community of people at that just snowballed.

It was, it was so moving to see. And she was comparing it to John Oliver a few years ago, like famously was like, we’re gonna raise $15 million to get rid of medical debt, and which is amazing, right? And she was like…

Rebecca:
Ah, see, this is what I love about your story that like, all you speakers out there pay attention to what Sally did just then because that was so emotional I, what I, what I took from that was like, here we are single individuals thinking and my voice won’t make that much of a dent. What can I do? What can I maybe I can raise 20,000? Oh, my gosh, look at what she did. And the power of community the power of a single voice with an emotional connection. Yeah. And you can change the world.

Sally:
What was so cool about what happened, of course, the impact of the money like we don’t even I think fully understand the, the impact of that money. But the AHA of, of this really politically diverse group of people coming together and saying, Look at, look at this, look at what we can do together, what we can do together.

Rebecca:
I love that.

Sally:
Look at that, what our shared values are.

Rebecca:
You know, that is that’s exactly when I talked about the power of cooperation. That’s where I was trying to get and I just didn’t get there. So that story does it because it is truly when you, when you take a clear, common external enemy, like all of those into medical debt, that we’re all going to fight against this medical debt. Now, your political organization, your affiliation, your race, your gender, none of that matters. We’ve been bigger to fight. Like, that’s huge. That’s huge. Giving, we’re giving freely, like…

Sally:
I don’t care who this money goes to. I don’t and I don’t want to know, I don’t care who they voted for.

I don’t care.

Right? I want to and I can with five bucks, ease somebody’s pain, because collectively, we’ve done something really powerful together. So anyway,

Rebecca:
Ah, that’s beautiful. That moves me.

Sally:
Yeah, you know, and you had said some at the very beginning, you were like, I didn’t realize I moved often. That doesn’t surprise me. Because when we are people whose job it is, is to lead with our words. Like, we have to pay attention to what? And we have to notice, we’ve got to be like, Oh my gosh, I’m seeing something I’m feeling something. I’m noticing something. How did this happen?

Rebecca:
Yeah.

Sally:
How can I turn that around and share it with other people? Because that’s leadership?

Rebecca:
What do you just said that is so spot on. I mean, it is taking all of these emotional things that we all feel and that’s it. Like, I’ll never know, for example, what it feels like to walk around with, with skin that’s not white. I’m never know that. But I do have a feeling. I understand the feeling of frustration, of anger, of feeling like an imposter have these feelings. And so the more we can latch on to that, the more we can connect through the feeling. Now we can leave now we can take action now. We can empathize now we can connect with one another on a level that’s beyond skin or political affiliation or whatever. Yeah, that’s and that, you know, because your audience, you never know who’s sitting in your audience. That’s what allows you to transcend and connect everybody.

Sally:
It’s persuasion. And that’s how we bring people into an idea that they might otherwise discard.

Rebecca:
Yeah. So stepping into their truth first, right?

Sally:
You really have to? Yep. Oh my gosh, Rebecca. Love before we go, would you share with people where they can find out more about you and connect with you to keep this connection going?

Rebecca:
Sure. Absolutely. So the easiest place is to go onto my website. It’s Rebecca Heiss. Or you can find me on all the socials at Dr. That’s just Dr. Rebecca Heiss, I’m on Twitter and Facebook and instant all the things, and please go on and check out. I’ve got a new book coming out. You can pre-order it right now. Please do, please do it helps me if you preorder it. And if you go to instinctbook.com, I actually have a book club put together. So you’ll have access to video chapter summaries and prompts and challenges from each of the chapters. So I think it’s, it’s gonna be pretty cool. Since we’re talking about giving and like the power of community and connection. One of the reasons that I really want you to go to instinct book calm is there’s an opportunity to donate the books, right to your local charities to like a leadership club to the YMCA to a Boys and Girls Club. Because my challenge with this book is really to foster leader leadership potential in everyone met from high school on up.

Sally:
Love it. Oh my god. Okay. I’m assuming you’re doing a lot of speaking now around this book.

Rebecca:
Yes, I am. Yes, I am. Absolutely. So if you are looking to connect with me about this book about speaking opportunities, of course available for doing both virtual which is how we’re doing most things these days or in person does. We’ll see how things go. But yeah, wide open to any opportunities there. And thank you so much for the opportunity to plug my book into the on here. This is delightful.

Sally:
And you did mention a podcast. So podcast listeners always like to find new podcast. So what’s the name of your podcast?

Rebecca:
The name is The Fearless Year or You’re Fearless Here. We have a Fearless Year Podcast this official title. And the Fearless Year Podcast is basically created by myself and a creative director Nathan Robinson, who I’ve been working with for years now. He’s amazing. We sat down we’re like, we have some fears that we want to get over. How do we do this? How can we walk through an entire year so there’s an entire year of episodes from experts on everything from empathy to challenging people to negotiation to all the things that get us kind of tied up in knots and a way for us to tie those knots and walk more fearless leader in the world.

Sally:
Cannot wait to go check it out. Oh my gosh, Rebecca.

Rebecca:
Thank you, Sally.

BIG HUGS, 

Sally Z

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